The final step of the AgDi recommendation process is the placement of each student into one of several categories that we call ‘tester-types’. We created these categories to serve as a shorthand way to summarize a student’s strengths & weaknesses as seen in the student’s AgDi results. Understanding your tester-type will help you understand why we recommended the ACT or SAT for you.

You can find a brief description of our tester-types below, or read the full explanation of each in our Agnostic Diagnostic white paper.

SAT-1: The Problem-Solver

This tester-type is comprised of students who consistently performed noticeably better on the SAT sections than on the ACT sections.

SAT-2: The Mathematician

This tester-type is comprised of students who didn’t necessarily score higher in every SAT section, but who scored higher on math than verbal and likely scored higher on the SAT half of the test overall.

SAT-3: The Zen Master

This tester-type is comprised of students who displayed significant timing problems on the ACT half of the test, to the extent that they’re likely to have greater success mastering the more complex questions on the SAT than they would attempting to learn to match the speed of the ACT.

ACT-1: The Olympic Sprinter

This tester-type is comprised of students who consistently performed noticeably better on the ACT sections than on the SAT sections.

ACT-2: The Cyclone

This tester-type is comprised of students who may not have had outstanding accuracy on the ACT half of the test (in fact, their SAT performance may have even been better than their ACT performance) but who were able to finish both the ACT Reading and Science sections within the time limit and can therefore likely be coached to improve their accuracy significantly.

ACT-3: The Specialist

This tester-type is comprised of students who may not have had outstanding accuracy on the ACT half of the test (in fact, their SAT performance may have even been better than their ACT performance) but who were able to finish one of the ACT Reading and Science sections within the time limit. Because those two sections are identically timed and require very similar skills, this indicates that the student can likely be coached to finish the other; additionally, the student can almost certainly be coached to improve their accuracy significantly.

ACT-4: The Equilibrialist

This tester-type is comprised of students who had roughly equivalent timing problems on both the ACT and SAT portions of the test, particularly on the Reading sections. Because ACT strategy tries to teach students how to answer the questions with a minimum of reading, while SAT strategy attempts to teach students how to read more effectively, it’s likely that students in the ACT-4 category will find the ACT strategies more compatible with their testing strengths & weaknesses.

ACT-5: The Humanit(ies)arian

This tester-type is comprised of students whose scores may have been on the lower end overall but for whom math was the weakest part of the test. Because ACT Math generally contains less difficult © Inspirica 2020 content and because Math is only a quarter of the ACT composite score compared to half of the SAT composite score, this suggests that the student will find score improvement easier to attain on the ACT.

ACT-6: The Hipster

This tester-type is comprised of students who are edge cases, demonstrating strengths and weaknesses on both tests. This suggests that the student likely has a higher ceiling on the ACT when working with us because the ACT is a more teachable test overall.

ACT-7: The Time Lord

This tester-type is comprised of students who have extended time on the ACT. Because the timing of the ACT is the primary challenge of the test, ET often has a larger impact on a student’s success on the ACT than on the SAT; this suggests that the student can more easily be coached to succeed on the ACT.

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